Jack Frost pays a visit.

You would normally be fairly safe from frost in mid May in the southern half of England, but the weather just seems to keep us on our toes this season. Excessive rain over the winter, followed by cold easterlies sucking the moisture from the soil as we tried to catch up with drilling in March.  A lack of rain in the first part of April … Continue reading Jack Frost pays a visit.

Glass half full.

I am a glass half full type of person as I am sure most farmers probably are. Otherwise, why would you plant something 10 months in advance of harvesting, not knowing what the weather was going to throw at you?  My precision agriculture problems of the last few weeks are slowly progressing towards a solution, but we are not there yet. Thanks to long conversations … Continue reading Glass half full.

Which one came first?

Spring oats are on their way now despite the efforts of the crows. You can just see the empty husk of an oat seed bottom left of the photo. Anywhere the slot left by the drill had not been closed, they were in looking for seed to eat. So did cultivation type make any difference to which block emerged first? Was it autumn cultivated and … Continue reading Which one came first?

Three’s a crowd

We are taking social distancing to the limit here in this photo. No gatherings over 2 people and at least 2 metres apart. I think we have ticked those boxes. We meet each morning in the large and airy workshop. We started off 2 metres apart and are now nearer 5 metres. The three tractors that we run are all 215 horsepower John Deere but … Continue reading Three’s a crowd

A short respite.

So now you know, if you hadn’t already worked it out, it has been very wet! The above diagram is courtesy of the Environment Agency although I found it through ADAS. Pity those poor souls that find them selves in the black areas. It’s not surprising that they have little or no crop in the ground. We fall into the above normal/notably higher area but … Continue reading A short respite.

Time to build an ark?

As the water recedes from the winter linseed after the Thames flooded for the third time since Christmas, I can’t help thinking about those living further north and along the Welsh borders who have suffered much worse than we have. At least we have not suffered any damage to property or vehicles. We expect to get land under water on this part of the farm … Continue reading Time to build an ark?

Dry January and a mad March.

  My wife Liz decided she would have a go at dry January, but not until after her birthday! Technically she managed 21 days dry, which was considerably more than the weather achieved, as can be seen from our Sencrop data above. Our 5 year average for January is 70 mm, but this is distorted somewhat by the 29mm recorded in 2019. When just a … Continue reading Dry January and a mad March.